Ernest & Hannah Carlson

Ernest & Hannah Carlson

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Good people with strong Christian values have a way of finding each other, and nothing could be truer than the love story of Ernest and Hanna Carlson. Ernest Carlson was born in 1915 in Lacrosse, Washington. He grew up in Moscow, Idaho, and in 1940 had managed to save enough money to purchase a wheat farm in Hay, Washington. In 1952 he bought another farm and moved to the Winchester, Washington area.

Hanna Marie Reiman was born in 1917 in Quincy, Washington. She was Quincy Princess in her Senior year of High School and rode in Wenatchee’s Apple Blossom Parade. After high school, Hanna took a job as the editor of the Grant County Journal.

In September of 1957, Ernest and Hanna were married. Both in their early 40s, they set up house in Ephrata, Washington wheat farming, where they lived out their years. The Carlson's were active members of the Ephrata Lutheran Church and became acquainted with LBI/TLC when guest speakers from the school would visit. Although never blessed with children of their own, the Carlsons started donating to the school and helped fund the educations of generations of LBI/TLC students.

The Carlsons would travel to LBI/TLC in their camper truck to pay the school a visit. Ernest was known for walking up to students on campus and tucking a $50 dollar
bill in their hand - just because. They sold their wheat farm in the 1980s and invested the proceeds in LBI/TLC. Earnest passed away in 2000, and Hanna joined him in
2018. Through the many scholarships funded for students attending Seminary and Christian colleges, the Carlsons generous giving and estate gifts continue to make a lasting impact on students' lives today. Ernest and Hanna Carlson rest in the Quincy Cemetery under a shared tombstone that simply reads, "Together Forever."